Flywheel Delivers Data Management

Persistently storing data is the critical first step in planning for reproducible science. Defining file formats and organizing directories is a good start; in our experience this is where most researchers focus their efforts. But modern computer science provides many technologies that improve data storage, making data FAIR e.g. findable, accessible, interoperable, and reusable (see Flywheel delivers FAIR). Flywheel uses these tools in order to support reproducible science.

Metadata are important

The value of raw data, for example the numerical data of an image, is vastly increased when we know more about the data. This information – called the metadata – can tell us many important things: the instrument parameters used to acquire the data, information about the subject (demographics, medical conditions, etc.), time and place of the acquisition, and facts about the experimental context; for example, that the subject fell asleep during the resting state MR scan.  

The biomedical imaging community recognizes the importance of metadata in two important cases. First, by defining standard file formats (DICOM or NIfTI) that embed metadata into the file header. Second, the BIDS system recognizes the importance of metadata, using the file name or an accompanying file ‘sidecar’ to store useful metadata.

Storing metadata within a file header, or an accompanying file, is a good start. But using an extensible database offers many advantages. Here is why:

Databases are efficient

Nearly all modern computer operating systems use databases to store files and their metadata. For example, on Apple systems the (CMD-I) command returns metadata (‘Info’) about the file from the operating system’s database (comments, preview, kind of file) as well as standard Posix information like file size and date of access. The Apple Spotlight search uses the database to identify files.

There are many advantages to storing information about a file in a database compared to putting the information in the file header or accompanying file. For example, we have seen many cases in which people fail to keep the two files together; and sometimes they rename one of the files and lose the association between the data and metadata files. Putting the information in the file header avoids these problems but has others. Files are distributed across the disk making searches through file headers very inefficient. Also, files arise from many different sources and it is virtually impossible to guarantee that vendors keep up-to-date with changes. Headers are most useful for a particular type of file, but not for a large system.

Databases solve these problems by having the user interact with files through a unified interface that includes the name of the raw data file on disk as well as the associated metadata. To read the raw data, one consults the database for the location of the file containing the raw data. To read the metadata, one consults only the database. Typically, the database itself is small, and updates to its format or additions to its content are possible. 

Flywheel uses a document database (MongoDB) to manage user interactions with data and metadata. In the Flywheel system, you can read metadata via the web-browser interface. When programming, you can access metadata using the software development kits (SDKs) or REST API. 

Metadata can be attached to any object in the system hierarchy

The Flywheel data are organized in a hierarchy: Group, Project, Subject, Session, Acquisition, Files and Analyses. This hierarchy can incorporate virtually any file type and associated metadata. Most of our customers store files containing medical imaging data in the hierarchy, including MRI, PET, CT, OCT, and pathology images.  But some customers store other types of files, such as computer graphics files that are useful for machine learning. All of the objects, the files and the organizational containers (Project, Subject, Session, Acquisition, Analyses) are described in the database, each with its own metadata. Users can search, annotate and reuse the files and containers from any level in the Flywheel system.

Metadata are flexible

By using a general database, Flywheel can be complete and flexible. For MRI DICOM files, the database includes all of the header information in the file, such as TR, TE, voxel size, and diffusion directions. In addition, the Flywheel database includes fields for users to place searchable notes, say, about the experiment. The database can also include links to additional experimental information about the subject and auxiliary measures (often behavioral data).

The Flywheel database can add fields without needing to rebuild the entire database. For example, as new MRI technologies developed, we were able to add additional fields that describe the new acquisition parameters. Similarly, Flywheel regularly expands to manage new types of data; as we do so, we add new database fields.

Data reuse

Flywheel helps users to reuse data by (a) helping them find data sets and (b) using the search results to create a new project in their database. Adding a database entry eliminates the need for data copying – we simply copy database entries to specify the new project’s sessions, acquisitions, and files.  Flywheel calls such a virtual project a ‘Collection’. 

Reproducible science 

Data management and the ability to search across all types of objects enhance the value of the data. Carefully storing and managing metadata supports finding and reusing data, two pillars of FAIR and reproducible research

Contact us here for a demonstration to see how Flywheel’s database and further computing features can be the backbone of your research.